Welcome to An English Rose, an unofficial fansite dedicated to the English actress Emilia Fox. We aim to provide you with news, photos, videos, and much
more on Emilia. You may have seen her in British productions like Merlin, Silent Witness, Falcón, The Wipers Times, Suspension of Disbelief,
Trap for Cinderella, The Wrong Mans and most recently in a short film called Not Ever. Don't forget to check out the gallery as well & enjoy your stay!
Posted by · Admin on Dec 2, 2013

I have also uploaded the photos on our Tumblrcheck them out here:)

Get an exclusive insight into the Rapture, Blister, Burn publicity shoot with our behind-the-scenes photo gallery of Emma Fielding and Emilia Fox.

Source: hamsteadtheatre.com

Posted by · Admin on Dec 1, 2013

Added a few additional HQ photos from the private event Emilia attended last week. Thanks Helen at jrhysmeyers.com for these gorgeous photos!

Posted by · Admin on Nov 30, 2013

Stars of hit period drama DOWNTON ABBEY will be filling in as serving staff at upmarket London restaurant The Ivy on Sunday (01Dec13) in a bid to raise money for charity.

Actors Laura Carmichael, Jim Carter and Brendan Coyle will join writer Julian Fellowes to serve diners at the event organised by their co-star Samantha Bond.

Guests will pay £150-a-head for the privilege of being waited on by stars including Emilia Fox, Maureen Lipman and Imelda Staunton.

Carmichael had the chance to practice her serving skills during the filming of an adaptation of Madame Bovary, in which she plays a servant, and she tells the London Evening Standard, “All that bobbing – I’m very versatile.”

The money raised at the event will be donated to Acting for Others, a group of charities working with ill, injured or elderly actors and backstage staff.

Bond says, “The thing about our industry is when life is good it’s very good and when life is bad, it’s hateful. If you’re unable to work there’s no back-up.”

Source: scottishdailyexpress.co.uk

Posted by · Admin on Nov 30, 2013

She Should Have Known Better is a new series of work by artist Alice Instone on show at the former home of the writer Henry James – Lamb House, Rye (now owned by the National Trust) in December 2013.

Instone’s highly charged paintings of women draw on James’ themes of freedom and transgression to showcase women who broke the rules.

A number of well known women have sat as James’ heroines or notorious women from history; including Helen McCrory, Charlotte Church, Claudia Winkleman, Emma Freud, Jo Wood, Emilia Fox, Alice Temperley, Lola Lennox and Nicole Farhi.

Emilia Fox as Marie Antoinette by Alice Instone

Alice said: “James wrote about women who were constrained by society’s rules and who were punished for breaking them.

“I’m interested in how we still punish women who don’t fit our expectations, whether in the press or in daily life.

“Lamb House is fantastically atmospheric and a beautiful building so I hope the work also reflects this.

“James wrote, ‘we work in the dark’, something that has comforted me when I didn’t know what I was doing, or felt uncertain whether to risk ruining a painting with an experiment!”

Actress Emilia Fox said of Alice Instone: “I am in total awe of her work and the incredible women she has used to inspire her, both historically and present day.”

Television presenter Claudia Winkleman said: “I loved sitting for Alice. We drank tea and talked about Theda Bara and I wore a fake fur stole. It was win win.”

Alice Instone is an English artist who makes paintings of women concerned with gender and power, frequently depicting in?uential or well known public ?gures from Annie Lennox to Cherie Blair.

Her work is held in several public collections and her solo exhibitions include the House of Commons, the Royal Society of Arts, Northampton Museum, Chanel Head Of?ce, More London Place, The Cob Gallery and The House of St Barnabas in Soho.

Her work draws attention to how we consume images of women and the female archetype and historical stories and images are appropriated as part of the artist’s enquiry into the potency of certain images.

Instone was selected as a Woman of Achievement by Woman of the Year and regularly

features in the press, radio and television.

She lives in the Isle of Oxney with her husband and two children.

Lamb House is in West Street, Rye. Visit nationaltrust.org.uk.

Source: hastingsobserver.co.uk

Posted by · Admin on Nov 30, 2013

I’ve also updated the photo gallery with 11 new HQ photos of Emilia attending ‘A Journey Shared’ private event last week. Thanks Mary at stephen-amell.us for donating the photos :)


Link:
Appearances > 2013 > 26th Nov | Johnnie Walker Blue Label & Alfred Dunhill ‘A Journey Shared’ Private Event

Posted by · Admin on Nov 30, 2013

I’ve made full HD screen captures from all 5 episodes Emilia appeared in (yay for a blu-ray release :D).

This is probably one of my favourite characters she’s ever played…really looking forward to the second series even though we don’t know if Scarlett will be back. If you haven’t watched ‘The Wrong Mans’ yet I urge you to do so, it’s a brilliant and hilarious comedy! Links to the caps are below… enjoy!

Television Series > The Wrong Mans (2013) > HD Captures > 1×02 – Bad Mans
Television Series > The Wrong Mans (2013) > HD Captures > 1×03 – Dead Mans
Television Series > The Wrong Mans (2013) > HD Captures > 1×04 – Inside Mans
Television Series > The Wrong Mans (2013) > HD Captures > 1×05 – Wanted Mans
Television Series > The Wrong Mans (2013) > HD Captures > 1×06 – Running Mans

Posted by · Admin on Nov 29, 2013

Rapture, Blister, Burn, a thrilling play from Gina Gionfriddo, is coming to the Hampstead Theatre in 2014, and Harper’s Bazaar is offering all readers the chance to attend a very special showing featuring a talk by editor-in-chief Justine Picardie on 5 February. Focusing on the changing roles of women in society, it sees three generations of women coming together to talk about their own life choices – from the academic rock star who chose work over love, to the dedicated mother who missed out on having a career. We spoke to the play’s star, Emilia Fox, about women’s roles, feminism and whether you really can have it all…

What attracted you to the part in Rapture, Blister, Burn?

First of all, it was the discussions it made me want to have with my mum, best friends, and my daughter’s 25-year-old nanny; about trying to get the right balance between love, family and work. I went in and spoke to everyone – the casting director, the director – about what they thought. Is it possible to be successful at balancing all three? Or was it easy in earlier generations – when there were more clearly defined gender roles?

Were you already familiar with the play?

No, I wasn’t, but I’ve now read up on the American production a lot. There’s a lot of emphasis on how it’s a smart comedy – while it discusses issues relating to gender its not too bogged down in the ideals of feminism – it appeals to both men and women. I loved that it’s a play that discusses subjects relevant to all generations and sees, and that it transcends geography. It’s about the issues faced by women in the modern world.

Can you tell me a little about your character?

My character is Catherine – a celebrated academic who chose her career over a relationship. At the beginning of the play she is coming to terms with the death of her mother and what it means for her future as she has no family of her own. She looks at an old school friend couple and wonders if she would have been happier choosing that life instead.

Do you think women can “have it all”?

I don’t think all women necessarily want to have it all – it might be too ambitious in a way. If you try to have to it all you can drive yourself crazy. Juggling a career life and a domestic life and not wanting to spread yourself too thinly, and have time for everything, requires organisation. It’s what works for each individual person. For me, the Holy Grail is a healthy balance where I can be there for Rose (Emilia’s daughter), and provide for Rose, and still remember who I am hand in hand with being a good mother.

What do you think the play’s answer is?

The message of the play is – there is no answer. You have choices and you have to live with and by those. I think the great thing about the play is it will affect everyone differently. I hope everyone comes out into the bar afterwards and asks, “Why did Catherine do that?” Provoking discussion is a good sign of creative art!

What advice would you give to women who feel similarly to the characters in the play?

The grass is not always greener on the other side! Surround yourself with friends and family. Always communicate. Don’t seek out love for love’s sake. Learn to want what you already have.

How much do you think women’s lives have changed since the 1970s?

I can only speak for my own life, and as a child of the 1970s I’m grateful for all of the possibilities I’ve had – but I’m also a die hard romantic that loves the chivalrous gentleman. Interestingly the play suggests that the older and younger generations are happiest – not the middle – who struggle between the easily defined gender roles of the older generation and the “have it all” attitude of the younger generation.

To book in to this exclusive Harper’s Bazaar evening at the Hampstead Theatre:

Box Office number: 020 7722 9301 – Quote the promo code: Harpers14

Ticket prices: £44/£41 (including Harper’s Bazaar subscription)

Source: harpersbazaar.co.uk

Posted by · Admin on Nov 24, 2013

10 new HQ photos of Emilia attending the BFI Gala Dinner & Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards last month are up in the gallery now… love the head shots!

Thanks michael-ealy.com very much for the photos!